All Issues

Subjects

Bodies that matter; Re- (ad)dressing the canon in Euripides’ the bacchae
Marietta Kosma marietta.kosma@ell.ox.ac.uk

ELECTRYONE 

2021
Volume 7, Issue 2

 | pp.

50-66

Abstract:

A queer reading of Euripides’ the Baccahe, a tragedy of the fifth century BC. This paper addresses the ways in which female bodies escape the confines of their oikos, of the polis, of reproductive futurism and ultimately of an essentialized identity, while attaining an alternative identification. Narratives of violence, commodification and objectification of the body are exposed through the dialectic of the gaze. The notion of performativity of the body comes to the forefront as it is directly connected to the exposition of a queer identity. The definitional boundaries of the body are explored through queer studies, feminism, psychoanalysis and phenomenology. The possibility for same-sex desire emerges, exposing the complexity of female sexuality. The transformation of Agave to a radical subject through subversive acts of agency is revealed. This paper signals at the creation of a space for the recognition of queer kinship challenging reproductive futurism. I propose a number of avenues for further research, particularly in developing linkages between the various strands of the sparagmos and queer futurity.
“Portraits” of bifaces. Surficial findings from the palaeolithic tool-making workshops of nea artaki (Euboea, Greece)
Evi Sarantea evi.sarantea@hotmail.com

ELECTRYONE 

2021
Volume 7, Issue 2

 | pp.

21-49

Abstract:

Along the widespread flint rocks of Nea Artaki, Euboea (Evia), in the years 1977-1978 I detected open sites with rock processing residues for the construction of Palaeolithic tools, whereas evidence of settlements with thousands of tools were found in the coastal area. Nea Artaki used to be a major attracting pole for hunters and nomads, mainly for the construction of stone tools, from the Lower Palaeolithic to Chalcolithic period. The area has been declared an archeological site since 1985, but its prehistoric site was largely destroyed after the settlement expanded over the few years. Amongst the numerous stone tools I saved, a diversity of handaxes, cleavers, clactonian flakes etc. presented herein, are in consistency with the standards of the Lower Palaeolithic period. The scarcity of Palaeolithic quarry sites in Greece, the density, the number, the variety of artifacts from different periods, their extent on the ground surface, as well as the specificity of the composition of the locally available flints – which are being eliminated following their use as building materials at present – shall indicate the urgency for the effective protection of communal sites and one of the most significant open palaeolithic sites in Greece.
Deviation from established order in Euripides’ Bacchae
Vasiliki Chatzipetrou vickychatzipetrou@gmail.com

ELECTRYONE 

2021
Volume 7, Issue 2

 | pp.

11-20

Abstract:

Euripides’ play the Bacchae, is a profoundly social and political play where matters of significance like women’s rights, freedom of expression along with established social order and patriarchy are addressed. Euripides’ barbarian women become the means of resistance in the struggle of the superior males to retain their position in society without disrupting established order as it is defined by them. It seems that the opponent awe of patriarchy is “the other” i.e. the barbarian Bacchae or the maenads who were barbarized due to the Dionysian mania. Additionally, the deviation from established order leads to barbarism as one notices in the barbarian women’s conduct or Pentheus’ effeminacy which constitutes an act of barbarism in itself.
Timeless standards of democracy: JFK quotes ancient Athens
Anastasios Chamouzas chamouzas@aegean.gr

ELECTRYONE 

2021
Volume 7, Issue 2

 | pp.

1-10

Abstract:

The political views of John Fitzgerald Kennedy seem to be deeply inspired by the ideals of liberty, equality and democratic governance of classical Greece, established and widely accepted in the western world as the “cradle of democracy”. His persuasive rhetoric often includes quotes and symbolism from the legacy and splendour of ancient Athens, its standard values and democratic principles, as well as its legal and political institutions. Kennedy quotes the encomium of Pericles’ Funeral Oration to the exemplary democratic system of Athens to juxtapose it to the values of liberty of his homeland, which differentiate it from other states in the eyes of the world; both Athens and Massachusetts are proved to be a special example, a “City upon a Hill”, because of their unique political achievements (for freedom and against tyranny).
Translation as a Critical and Cultural Approach: The Case of Translating Latin Poetry into Arabic (An Overview)
Magda El-Nowieemy Alexandria University, Egypt magda_now@yahoo.com

ELECTRYONE 

2020
Volume 7, Issue 1

 | pp.

42-52

Abstract:

The Arab World, especially Egypt, is now living in a period of abundant translations into Arabic from the original Greek and Latin texts. This has helped cross the borders and make classical writers accessible to the Arab readers. In this regard, we may distinguish three levels or types of readers in the Arab World: firstly general public, secondly educated and learned amateurs, and thirdly specialized academicians and students. The Arab translator of Latin poetry faces many problems of translation, and accordingly has to handle them, as persuasively as possible, to pave the way for the Arabic translation to meet the demands of the readers, seeking their endorsement. The Arab translator also has to elucidate the cultural context in which a Latin poem was written by enriching his translation with commentaries and notes, otherwise the translation may be meaningless and tasteless to the Arab public audience. The translator, at the same time, cannot help avoiding his (or her) critical sense to be in work during the process of translation. In my present paper, I argue that translating Latin poetry into Arabic is a creative re-construction that involves both critical and cultural perspectives.
Was Socrates educated by Alcibiades?
Andrej Kalaš Department of Philosophy and History of Philosophy, Faculty of Arts, Comenius University in Bratislava, Slovak Republic andrej.kalas@uniba.sk
Zuzana Zelinová Department of Philosophy and History of Philosophy, Faculty of Arts, Comenius University in Bratislava, Slovak Republic zuzana.zelinova@uniba.sk

ELECTRYONE 

2020
Volume 7, Issue 1

 | pp.

20-41

Abstract:

The best-known historical character who is connected to Socratic education is Alcibiades. The link between this pedagogical relationship and the ancient notion of παιδεία can be found in almost every author of Σωκρατικοὶ λόγοι. Scholars of ancient philosophy concur that all Socratic works on Alcibiades were meant as a unified response of sorts, on the part of Socrates’ circle, to Polycrates’ Accusation, with the objective of demonstrating Socrates’ innocence. There would seem to be no reason to doubt Socrates’ positive effect on Alcibiades. On the other hand, we cannot question the Alcibiades’ undeniable negative side of Alcibiades. The aim of this paper is to answer a controversial question: how could Socrates the philosopher have been educated by the arrogant Alcibiades? Whereas most contemporary scholars consider Alcibiades solely as a student of Socrates (as receiving a Socratic education), we approach the matter from the other way around: we wish to establish the extent to which Alcibiades acted on Socrates, in a certain sense, thus educating him (even if unintentionally). In our paper, we focus on Aeschines’ and Plato’s portrayals of Alcibiades.
A kinesiological approach to the role of the Chorus in Aristophanes’ Plutus
Ioanna Mastora Ph.D. Phil, Athens University, Postdoctoral Researcher, Athens University Department of Philosophy joannamastora@gmail.com

ELECTRYONE 

2020
Volume 7, Issue 1

 | pp.

14-19

Abstract:

The article attempts to present basic elements of political ideology that can be found on the choral performances of the Aristophanes’ comedy named “Plutus”, which is his last surviving work. The comedy was presented to the Athenian audience in 388 BC to glorify and demonstrate the unfair distribution of wealth and the social inequalities, while highlighting the decline of human values. In spite of the fact that in this work the Chorus has a diminished role nevertheless refers to the unjust distribution of wealth and the explosion of corruption with an interesting kinesiological approach.
TRIUMPH AND POETIC GLORY IN OVID
Paola Gagliardi Università degli Studi della Basilicata paolagagliardi@hotmail.com

ELECTRYONE 

2020
Volume 7, Issue 1

 | pp.

1-13

Abstract:

My paper focusses on the treatment of the triumph as a metaphor for poetic glory in Ovid. In the Augustan poetry the triumph theme is treated predominantly from a political perspective, but images and situations of the ceremony are also used from a literary point of view. Ovid in particular gives this topic original and ambiguous features.
Oh my God! You’re in the Army Now: An Analysis of the Horus-in-Uniform Images
Jeff Cutright Guanmei International School Dongguan Guangdong, China cutrij@yahoo.com ABSTRACT:

ELECTRYONE 

2020
Volume 6, Issue 2

 | pp.

45-58

Abstract:

The author argues that images of the Egyptian deity Horus, dressed as Roman soldiers, are works of Roman propaganda. While the focus here is on the statue from the British Museum, EA 36062, the argument applies to similarly attired images of Horus. Several Egyptian cults spread across the empire, but were rarely depicted as soldiers, and for this reason, one must ask why Horus was shown in this way. The proposal is that such images intended to tell the native Egyptian viewer that since Horus was a servant of the empire through enrollment in the army, the viewer should be also.
Keywords:Egypt, Horus, mythology
The concept of the refugee and immigrant in the ancient Greek world: privileges and limitations.
Ioannis Papadomarkakis University of the Aegean Rhodes, Greece gpapadom@otenet.gr
Maria Kaila University of the Aegean Rhodes, Greece kaila@rhodes.aegean.gr

ELECTRYONE 

2020
Volume 6, Issue 2

 | pp.

28-44

Abstract:

This article examines the ways in which the literature of classic Greece depicts the concepts of migration and displacement. Different literature styles, such as history, drama and comedy approach the theme, underlining in this way the dense social impact it occupied. Through the revisiting of various classic extracts, this research aims to illustrate the way classic Greece was standing towards both the forcibly exiled and the willingly migrated, to the degree at least, this permeated classic works. Finally, this work aims to draw parallels between the past and today, regarding how the refugee is perceived.