Articles with keyword: Aristotle

About the truth: Aristotle and john philoponus
Alexantra Ntotsika Aristotle University of Thessaloniki

ELECTRYONE 

2017
Volume 5, Issue 2

 | pp.

71-79

Abstract:

The paper is about the philosophical inquiry of truth and falsehood on the Aristotle’s treatise ‘‘De anima’’ and the Philoponus’ commentary on the Aristotelian work (Commentaria in Aristotelem Graeca). Since, the philosophical game of truth and falsehood is directly related with the cognitive process the current study mainly focuses on the definition and the analysis of the intellect, which retrieves stimuli from the senses and imagination in order to operate effectively. For that reason, there is an explanation in the two distinct chapters that are concerned with the concept of the Aristotelian intellect and its interpretation from John Philoponus, in order to extract potential philosophical differentiations or similarities. The Aristotelian intellect (nous) anchors the initial data through a logical judgement and follows the diversity of the combinations of reality. During that combinatorial operation of logic that derives from the senses and imagination (phantasia), it is possible for falsehood to be inducted, in such way that the combinations will no longer meet the existing combinations of reality. The most essential element of Philoponu’ s philosophy on truth and falsehood is intertwined with the composition of a theory regarding the distinction of nous-dianoia-doxa and the distinction of simple/impartitionable (amerista) or divisible (merista) things and not of meanings. Among those, the distinction between human- divine intellect (which is identical to the truth) is preceding and that may put at risk the aristotelian work, as it could connect it with the neo-platonian theory.
Subjects:Uncategorized
The aristotle perspective of "The polis" in today’s world society
Ioannis Ch. Karydas Dr. Panteion University - Urban Planer

ELECTRYONE 

2017
Volume 5, Issue 2

 | pp.

49-62

Abstract:

This paper aims to understanding perspectives of the Aristotelian Polis in today’s society. As the modern world becomes increasingly globalized, digitalized, “virtual” etc, it is important to concentrate on the basic unit at which Aristotle’s political philosophy were intended to operate under the Polis, the city –state of the ancient Greece. Looking closer at how the Polis is referred in Aristotle’s Politics, it appears that the Polis was both a geographical particular location (Oikismos) and actively participated citizens (polites) in their community through moral and virtual political involvement (Politeia). The Polis was defined as a political ensemble of participated citizens, and one Polis differs from another by its Politeia. The Polis was by nature and Men also were by nature inclined to the Polis because they are by nature inclined to eudaimonia, to happiness. The Polis was the only human institution that can allow men to be real happy living a virtuous good life. The Polis exists for the common good life and we must rethink about the common political moral conceptions of the happiness, the freedom, the self-sufficient, real democracy. Today, the modern conception of a world nation-state or of local authorities’ institutions differs dramatically from that of the Polis. The Aristotelian Polis can be restart in a way to aim to restore the ideas of the virtual life and the ultimate happiness to our urban planning attitudes. But it would be very difficult to incorporate the Aristotelian thought in relation to the present society as the world state is concerned with the external economic evaluation of the society. So it is necessary to incorporate the Aristotelian idea of the Polis by strengthening the sense of the virtual and moral way of life and the local community identity, engaging more people to participate at a local level politic life, by making real democratic political activity personal rather than a mere matter of statistics and digital icons. Finally, Aristotle should still remain an important thinker for today urban society. The Polis can demonstrate again the importance of sharing an integrated and common democratic political relationship between men - citizens and urban society.
Subjects:Uncategorized
Psychodrama and Sociodrama: Aristotelian Catharsis Revisited
Dina Abd Elsalam Department of English Language and Literature Faculty of Arts University of Alexandria

ELECTRYONE 

2015
Volume 3, Issue 2

 | pp.

34-50

Abstract:

In the 4th century B.C, Aristotle was to highlight the healing power of drama. He argued in the Poetics that drama has a therapeutic effect on the spectators, since it exposes them to a high level of emotional pressure, so much so that when the dramatic tension is resolved, the spectators eventually attain catharsis. His formulations were basically a reaction against Plato’s vehement attack on poetry. In the 20th century, Jacob L. Moreno, an Austrian-American psychiatrist, who is widely recognized as the founder of both psychodrama and sociodrama, realized the therapeutic effect of drama on his patients and was to use it as a means of treatment. Despite the fact that Aristotle and Moreno are separated by many centuries, their theories seem to converge as both stress the remedial influence of drama and its cathartic effect. Moreno, however, argued that there were differences between psychodramatic catharsis, on the one hand, and Aristotlean catharsis on the other, as the former drew on dramatic sources from the Near East. It is the aim of this paper to highlight how Aristotle and Moreno came to formulate their respective theories concerning catharsis, discussing the similarities and differences regarding their proposed catharses, and tracing Aristotlean echoes in Moreno’s theory.
Subjects:Ancient Greek Literature, Philosophy